Two Key Components to Air Duct Cleaning


Commercial & Residential Air Duct Cleaning


1. Breaking Contaminants Loose

To start, the first key component to air duct cleaning is breaking the contaminants loose. The video shown above displays a whip being used with gas compressed air. Using gas compressed air doesn’t mean there’s gas in the air, it means the air compression is powered by a gas air compressor. The tools that help break the contaminants loose are only as strong as the compressed air that is being used. 

As a matter of fact, according to HyperVac Technologies, “There’s no way you can do a proper duct cleaning job unless you use gas powered compression.” HyperVac Technologies encourages air duct cleaning companies to not buy electric air compressors and warns them by saying companies that try to sell you one are “just trying to rip you off.” 

two key components to cleaning the HVAC System Correctly

CFM is an acronym for cubic feet per-minute. The relevancy of CFM has to an air compressor, is how fast it fills up the tank and continuously maintains the PSI of the forced air. PSI stands for pound-force per square inch. Although, electric air compressors have similar PSI strength, 4.6 CFM at 175 PSI vs. 24 CFM at 175 PSI, is a huge difference. 

For the purpose of breaking contaminants loose, it doesn’t matter which tool is used if it’s not used with gas compressed air. Amber’s Air Duct Cleaning uses a gas powered air compressor to clean air ducts!

two key components t cleaning the HVAC system correctly

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Any information provided will not be sold or used.

2. Collection of Contaminants

The final component to air duct cleaning is the collection of contaminants. Also shown in the video, the gas compressed air not only breaks the contaminants loose, but also collects them with a powerful negative air suction. In the same way CFM is applicable to an air compressor, negative CFM power is essential to extracting the contaminants that have been broken loose. 

The objective is to break the contaminants loose, and extract them without letting them back into the air. If this is not done properly you can do more harm than good. Furthermore, anything less than 3,000 CFM of negative air suction will not clean the system correctly. To tell the truth, 3,000 CFM of negative air suction will provide enough negative CFM to clean a home of 1200 square feet or less. Homes larger than 1200 Sq Ft will need more negative CFM. 

two key components to cleaning the HVAC system correctly

Lastly, when cleaning the entire HVAC system, it is to be placed under continuous negative pressure (a strong vacuum), to prevent the spread of contaminants. Continuous negative pressure allows very fine particles to be removed from the system as they become airborne, ensuring that these particles are not released into the living space when the system is turned on after cleaning. 

Amber’s Air Duct Cleaning

Notably, Amber’s Air Duct Cleaning has NADCA (National Air Duct Cleaners Association) approved equipment and has the two key components to air duct cleaning. Even more, we clean:

  • air ducts

  • coils

  • drain pan

  • registers

  • grills

  • air plenum

  • blower motor and assembly

  • heat exchanger

  • air filter

  • air cleaner

According to NADCA, the “push-pull method” is the most efficient and effective method to clean air ducts. This method breaks contaminants loose with forced air & agitation and extracts contaminants with a high powered vacuum. Are your local air duct cleaners using an an electric or a gas powered air compressor to break contaminants loose? Does their air duct cleaning machine provide enough negative pressure to collect all the contaminants? 

Why not pay less for the BEST? As a matter of fact, we’re less expensive and our equipment is stronger than any other local, family-owned and operated company. Amber’s Air Duct Cleaning is your local duct cleaner! Call (517) 885-3000 to schedule your dryer vent or air duct cleaning in Haslett, Okemos, East Lansing, Williamston, DeWitt, St. Johns, Laingsburg, Perry, Mason, Holt, Eaton Rapids, Dimondale, Lansing, or Grand Ledge, MI.